Potential market

SECTION I: The product

 

1a

The innovation potential of this product is related to:

 

Technology-driven innovation (under the influence of the development of science – the market is not ready for the product)

Market-driven innovation (as a result of market surveys, the market expects the product)

Replacement of existing product

Product related to cost reduction

Radical new product

Other, what…

 

Europe’s Future Internet and Digital agenda recently highlighted the importance of Smart Cities and their cross-cutting issues in the information era. Their dense, urban environments are well known for the vast amounts of produced and exchanged. Viewed from a slightly different perspective, these social ecosystems are shaped under the rising requirement of people to communicate, get connected with each other and most important to have appropriate and timely access to information regardless of their or of the information’s location.

These facts explain why smart cities make such ideal candidates when it comes to the evaluation and the evolution of the next wave of internet technologies and services. Any successful attempts to deliver them will deliver real value back to the citizens and in a sense cater for their informational and other needs. This will translate among others into social benefits, sustainable economic development, improved quality of life and undoubtedly competitive advantages for the cities that achieve that, (e.g. Seoul).

Nevertheless all this presupposes certain essential conditions concerning the nature of the information and the development/provision of web-based services. As far as the information is concerned, there is a growing consensus that although it is produced, collected and exchanged in large amounts, at the same time it is of an isolated nature, scattered, difficult recognizable by users and applications and in a sense anything else but (re)usable.

Currently, revolutionary technologies such as the Semantic Web and linked data have reached the maturity level needed to support the issues concerning information. They now play a significant role in resolving the user’s informational and service needs and are continuously offering elegant solutions in exchanging information at an interoperable and reusable fashion. In particular, Linked Data may now be viewed as an intermediate, independent layer on the OSI layer architecture, between the networking and the application layers, since it provides a common data model for all applications . Their popularity is undeniably confirmed by the dramatically growing Linked Data cloud .

 

1b

What added value for end-users does the product hold?
• higher quality
• Better technical characteristics
• Other …

The e-cities platforms layer mainly consists of the incoming raw data streams that are produced in large isolated platforms and sensors in all urban ecosystems (economy, utilities, governance) and the associated web services that these streams attempt to drive through various platforms.

The initial objective is to meet the needs of both citizens and businesses, providing on-line applications and complete e-services through the adoption of information and communication technologies.

The project accounts this level as an input from which real value can now be extracted by overcoming issues of the past concerning the nature of the information and the development/provision of web-based services.

As far as information issues are concerned, the integration of mature semantic web technologies will take advantage of the information which was so far isolated and unexploited. The end result will involve functional entities addressing specific needs and offering elegant solutions in exchanging information at an interoperable and reusable way. On the other hand, the project’s proposed architecture will promote user friendliness and attract the end users with the aim to satisfy their needs for information.  This will become possible via solutions which are independent of the underlying protocols and technologies. This way the platforms and sensors already available should be able to intercommunicate and share data, content, services and resources. Rich, innovative services may then be provided in a seamless and on demand way with obvious benefits for enterprises, individuals and communities.

 

 

 

 

1c

What is the Unique Sales Proposition of the potential product?

The unique feature is the data application laer layer with linked data:

The objectives of this layer are:

·    To develop APIs for sophisticated queries by simple users without any knowledge on SPARQL

·    To integrate or use Visualisation APIs with Linked Data.

The components of the Application Interface Layer are:

Linked Data APIs.

This component seeks to develop APIs, data formats and supporting tools for Linked Data. This development process includes, but is not limited to, accessing linked data via a developer-friendly format (like JSON). The APIs are intended to be deployed as a proxy in front of a SPARQL endpoint to support:

·     Generation of documents (information resources) for publishing Linked Data

·     Provision of sophisticated querying and data extraction features, without the need for end-users to write SPARQL queries

·     Delivery of multiple output formats from these APIs, including a simple serialisation of RDF in JSON syntax

Visualisations APIs

The Visualisations APIs component involves a common interface to expose data on the web and a common interface to provide data to visualizations. Such available APIs are Google Visualisations API, MIT Simile Exhibit API, Yahoo pipes API, protovis API etc. The Visualization API will demonstrate the value of linked e-cities data by creating interesting applications using semantic web technologies.

 

Also the service integration layer is a unique feature:

Service Integration Layer

The objectives of this layer are:

·    to support users in creating semantic annotations for services. Editors like SWEET (Semantic Web sErvices Editing Tool)—and SOWER could be used to annotate Web APIs and WSDL services respectively.

·     to publish the Semantic Web Services on the web following the Linked Data principles.

For that reason, within the proposed project, an open call will be addressed to Web Services Providers’ groups (Companies, Universities, Organizations, etc) who will be engaged in creating web services and semantically annotating them.

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION 2: The Market

 

 

2a

What is the target market for the product?

National ¨

European ¨

Global ¨x

Please describe the characteristics of your target market.

According to a new report from Marketsandmarkets, a marketing research company, the global smart cities market is expected to top $1 trillion by 2016. Currently, the report estimates the value of the smart cities market at $526.3 billion, with a compound annual growth rate of about 14.2 percent from 2011-2016. Over that time, the smart energy industry is expected to see the largest growth, from $22.9 billion in 2010 to $80.7 billion in 2016, a 28.7 percent compound annual growth rate. The smart transportation and smart security market are also expected to see growth, up to $68.8 billion and $307.2 billion by 2016.

 

 

2b

How the product is characterized from the following options? Number of companies producing similar products in the field.

• Base – applied by all companies in the industry

• Leading – applied by a single or limited number of competitive companies

• Key –at a development stage, but has already proven its potential

The Linked Data as leading  movement has led, during the last years, to a huge amount of datasets being exposed on the Web, and data being accessible in a standardised way; to name just a few well known examples: DBPedia, Geonames, the entire data.gov.uk effort. Internationalization of Linked Data is one of the major research issues in order datasets with non-Latin characters to be published following the principles of Linked Data. Publishing and releasing the e-cities’ platforms and sensors information in a machine readable way could offer huge economic and social improvements. It would also make the processing of e-cities’ data more transparent and give rise to new models of knowledge management. Developments in the UK and US are showing the potential of building a Web of Open Linked Data using Semantic Web Standards.

 

 

2c

What type of market demand will be satisfied?

• Existing demand – the market is already developed

• hidden (latent) demand – the market has yet to be developed

The demand is existing: According to the report: Globally, there are some 700 cities, each with population exceeding 500,000 and are growing faster than the average growth rate of cities. This opens up the market for industry players to grow their business in new and emerging smart cities. The infrastructure investment for these cities is forecasted to be $30 trillion to $40 trillion, cumulatively, over the next 20 years. These projections follow along with another report estimating growth in smart cities. Last year, Pike Research said that smart city investment would grow to more than $100 billion by 2020. With so much growth potential it’s no surprise that a large number of companies are quickly looking for their niche in the smart city market.

 

 

 

2d

What is the current stage of the product’s market life cycle?

• Implementation, implementation in production (leading to a radically new product offers)

• Growth (rapid spread within the industry or outside it)

• maturity (parameters of the technical characteristics of manufactured products reached their maximum, higher-grade products can be manufactured on the basis of technological substitution)

e-cities platform is a coordinated effort to bridge research and adaptation of new technologies towards the creation of smart cities, intelligent enterprise, i-government, i-transport and i-energy. The platform visualizes urban space through geospatial databases, capture embedded information and monitor intelligence applications. They are interaction paradigms in smart environments of multi-vendor interoperability solutions between heterogeneous devices and embedded systems that mobilize new applications for smart environments. Smart cities mirror the real time city operation pulse as system with systems. An urbanizing world means cities are gaining greater control over their development, economically and politically. Cities are also being empowered technologically, as the core systems on which they are based become instrumented and interconnected, enabling new levels of intelligently responsive operation. The system incorporates infrastructures, such as broadband networking, smart grids alongside various forms of renewable energy generation and building new systems of mobility based on distributed networks.  The common coordinated research effort has already produced an effective Smart city management platform adaptable for application to various city environments.

 

2e

Strategic partnerships (existing or potential).

The Intelligent Community Forum (http://www.intelligentcommunity.org) is a think tank that studies the economic and social development of the 21st Century community.  Whether in industrialized or developing nations, communities are challenged to create prosperity, stability and cultural meaning in a world where jobs, investment and knowledge increasingly depend on advances in communications.  For the 21st Century community, connectivity is a double-edge sword: threatening established ways of life on the one hand, and offering powerful new tools to build prosperous, inclusive and environmentally sustainable economies on the other.

European smart cities (www.smart-cities.eu/)

Open Knowledge Foundation (http://okfn.org/)

‘Open knowledge’ is any content, information or data that people are free to use, re-use and redistribute — without any legal, technological or social restriction. We detail exactly what openness entails in the Open Knowledge Definition. The main principles are:

Free and open access to the material

Freedom to redistribute the material

Freedom to reuse the material

No restriction of the above based on who someone is (e.g. their nationality) or their field of endeavour (e.g. commercial or non-commercial)

 

 

SECTION 3: The Competition

3a

What is the competition within your target market?

 Some examples are: CCC http://www.cphcleantech.com/innovation-platform

Access to public data on transportation, energy consumption, water conditions and a range of other information is a vital cornerstone in building the smart cities of the future.

Libelium, http://www.libelium.com/smart_cities/ a technology leader in wireless sensor networks, announces the completion of its Smart Cities platform. A new sensor board measures noise pollution, dust quantities, structural health and garbage levels.

 

3b

What competitive advantages will the introduction of the new product ensue?

• lower prices based on lower production costs

• product differentiation (uniqueness of the product proposal)

The competitive advantage is based on product differentiation based on linked data architecture (LOD):

The four principles of LOD are:

a.  Use URIs to identify things.

b.  Use HTTP URIs so that these things can be referred to and looked up (“dereference”) by people and user agents.

c.   Provide useful information about the things when their URIs are dereferenced, using standard formats such as RDF-XML or OWL-lite.

d.  Include links to other, related URIs in the exposed data to improve discovery of other related information on the Web.

 

3c

Potential products relate to the following price range:

• High price range

• Average price range

• Low price range

The product is offered at average prices. The pricing policy is based on cost saving related to other platforms related to information management. Information issues are concerned, the integration of mature semantic web technologies will take advantage of the information which was so far isolated and unexploited. The end result will involve functional entities addressing specific needs and offering elegant solutions in exchanging information at an interoperable and reusable way. On the other hand, the project’s proposed architecture will promote user friendliness and attract the end users with the aim to satisfy their needs for information.  This will become possible via solutions which are independent of the underlying protocols and technologies. This way the platforms and sensors already available should be able to intercommunicate and share data, content, services and resources. Rich, innovative services may then be provided in a seamless and on demand way with obvious benefits for enterprises, individuals and communities

 

3d

Potential products will be marketed:

• To regulated markets (e.g. heat supply, water supply, universal telecommunication services, agricultural products, fishing industry, architectural services)

• To markets operating on the principle of free negotiation between agents on the market

The product is offered in the market under free negotiations.

 

SECTION 4: Indicators

 

Estimated cost of the new products

180.000

Expected market volume (potential / maximum number of users)

26

Expected sales volume

1.300.000

Expected market share of the company (proportion between sales and total company sales in the relevant market)

0.01%

 

KEYWORDS QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT (0-5)..

 

Please put X as appropriate.

1

2

3

4

5

Added-value potential                   

 

 

 

 

x

Size of future market demand

 

 

 

 

x

Competitive positioning of the product                 

 

 

 

 

x

 

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